Evidence error. Behavioural- Stress brings changes in behaviour

Evidence
agreeing with the statement – According
to Stranks 2005, Stress fundamentally initiates a number of changes in body
processes which are complex and involve several levels, such as:

Emotional- A stressed individual is
emotionally drained and tends to be less confident. Moreover, they are tired
and their motivation level is quite low. Therefore, the performance capability
is not at their peak.

Cognitive- resulting in increased potential
for error and, in some cases, accidents arising through error. Being in a
stressful environment deteriorates the right mind set hence making them
incapable of making the accurate decision leading to potential error.

Behavioural- Stress brings changes in behaviour
resulting in poor or ruining relationships with colleagues. Moreover, they
become irritable, indecisive etc.

Moreover, it is a known factor that for
example when an individual is given a short deadline for a work they get
stressed and they are not able to present the best of themselves. Another
example might be individuals stressed from long hours, less pay, work place, bullying,
discrimination, racism etc, they tend to be tired and upset most of the time
and not being able to concentrate on their given assignment. Like in nursing
and teaching profession, they need to be emotionally involved with what they
are providing. Thus, a stressed-out nurse would not be able to take care of
his/her patient affectively. Same goes for teaching profession it involves a
lot patience which is not very easy if the teacher is stressed.

 

Evidence dis-agreeing with the statement – Stress
does not generally need to be a terrible thing. If it is managed efficiently,
certain levels of stress could be channelled into a positive component, giving
an adrenaline surge that might lead to success. In a general sense, stress is a
device or tool. It is intended to get us out from a difficult situation, it’s a
biological response that has saved our species in many circumstances.
Essentially, stress is a survival system. Survival is an issue that doesn’t
generally concern us in this century, yet it has its advantages. Under the
correct conditions, stress can be extremely gainful. In any case, those
conditions should be met for us to accomplish any beneficial outcomes. Although, according  to Hunter and Thatcher (2007) it is suggested
that these conditions may not hold equally for all workers, they found that
higher performance under stress occurred among workers who were more committed
to their employer and who were more experienced in their job. Work related
stress will not lead to lower job performance if the employees are provided
with autonomy to manage the job demands ( Parker & Wall, 1998). Examples of
ways to provide autonomy include giving groups of nurse’s discretion over
day-to-day operational decision as well as input into the running of their
groups; rearranging production work to allow workers to influence their own
working situations, work methods, and pace; and giving airline reservation
clerks authority to deal with special requests formerly referred to supervisors
and to quote complex fares formerly required specialists ( Yperen, Hagedoorn,
2003, p.346).